Conservation Projects

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Guadalupe Now

Coldwater Outreach Conservation Fund

Tribelle River WI – COC Grant Update

http://www.grtu.org/archives/KiapTUWish-Interim-Report.pdf

This is also listed under our Archives section of the website.

Click on one of the projects to find out more:


  • GRTU Members -

    We have received a COC grant request from Greg Meyer of the Kiap-TU-Wish chapter in Wisonsin’s driftless area. The project is a restoration project that will reintroduce Native Brook Trout to the Trimbelle River, a high quality spring creek located in the driftless area of Western Wisconsin.

    This project will stabilize severely eroding banks, provide in-stream cover, and increase spawning habitat. Stream bank tapering and plantings along the riparian strip will increase flood control/capacity and reduce the flow of sediment and pollutants into the stream. Narrowing and deepening the stream with rock will improve water quality and lower water temperature which will benefit reintroduction of Brook Trout. Bank stabilization with prairie grasses and in-stream habitat provided by lunker structures, plunge pools, and boulder clusters strategically placed within the stream will increase in-stream refugia and propagation opportunities for fish and stream wildlife. TUDARE6 emphasizes that restoration practices on cold-water Class II trout streams such as the Trimbelle have dramatic, immediate and long-term positive impacts to the stream and its wildlife. Upon completion, this project will restore approximately 4,392 feet of the Trimbelle.

    In addition, one of the objectives would be to decrease erosion and sediment load to the Mississippi River.

    GRTU would be one of several supporting organizations, and we have requested GRTU signage as well as a completion report when the project concludes.

    The GRTU board approved the Kiap-TU-Wish grant request during the board meeting on Jan 26, 2013

    This represents the seventh major Coldwater Conservation Outreach grant awarded by GRTU since the program’s inception.

    Previous grants were awarded to:
    Trout Run Creek – Minnesota
    South Platte River in Eleven Mile Canyon – Colorado
    Los Alimitos Creek – New Mexico
    Talarik Creek and the TU Pebble Mine Opposition Project – Alaska
    Lower Mountain Fork River – Oklahoma * (funding temporarily returned )
    Lake Yellowstone – Lake Trout mitigation

     



  • GRTU has received a grant request from David Sweet and the Wyoming state council to assist with the funding of telemetry equipment to study the movements and spawning areas of Lake Trout in Yellowstone Lake.

    Lake Trout were illegally introduced to the Yellowstone Lake system at least a decade ago. They are aggressive predators and have taken a fearful toll on the native population of Yellowstone Cutthroat trout in the Yellowstone system. This core population is one of the best remaining genetically pure populations of this species, and critical to the efforts to re-establish them in their historic watersheds.

    Estimates are that we have lost 90% of the Yellowstone Cutthroat population. The main culprit has been predation by the Lake Trout. The overall effort to reduce the Lake Trout population has been underway for about 4 years, and has included commercial netting of the fish. This has been helpful in managing the population, but the telemetry studies are recommended by scientists to better direct the netting activity, and also to identify Lake Trout spawning beds to reduce the recruitment of more of these predators.

    In addition to affecting the Yellowstone Cutthroat fishery, the decline has lead to a implosion of the ecosystem that depends on the cutts’ spawning runs into the rivers and tributaries of Yellowstone Lake. Predators like bears, foxes, ospreys, eagles, and many others depend on the cutthroats in the same way that ecosystems in the west are fueled by salmon.

    The overall project will cost nearly $500k, the majority of that coming from large grants. TU has taken on the task of the telemetry study, which will cost about $87K. Nearly $60K has already been raised. GRTU has been asked to fund $3k, which is in line with the Coldwater Conservation Outreach Fund guidelines.

    Timing is critical, as equipment needs t be purchased and in place by early June when ice-out occurs to allow the maximum time for study. This issue was first discussed by the board of directors at our January meeting. David Sweet joined a special board meeting held last night to answer questions about the proposal.

    Because of the need to move with alacrity, the board approved the proposal.

    This would be the 6th COCF project funded by GRTU, and extends our position as one of the premier chapters fighting the good fight of cold water conservation. We were the first chapter to contribute to the Save Bristol Bay effort, and are recognized for our conservation efforts by all of the leaders at the national level including TU CEO Chris Wood.



  • An update I recently received from Kevin Reilly, of Truchas River Chapter in New Mexico, about the status of the fish barrier to be constructed on Los Alamitos Creek. GRTU provided a Coldwater Outreach Conservation grant for to help fund the NEPA permitting process for this project two years ago and it is now moving forward. GRTU’s name will be on the completed project.

    In a nutshell, here’s the status of the Alamitos project:

    The environmental review under the National Environmental Policy Act was completed last year. It was done in-house by a Carson National Forest (CNF) fisheries biologist under a contract between the Truchas Chapter and the CNF, and the GRTU funds paid for that work.

    The Western Native Trout Initiative (WNTI)–a federal source–granted $50,000 to build the barrier. The Fish and Wildlife Service contracted with TU national for TU national to handle the money and get the barrier built.

    The CNF’s engineer decided to move the site of the barrier downstream a little bit to the site of an existing irrigation diversion owned by two acequias, traditional irrigation organizations which are local governmental entities under NM law. The diversion needed to be replaced, and the acequias had access to state funds to cover the difference between the WNTI funds and the cost of the barrier. The engineer also concluded that the site was the best site for the barrier.

    Construction on the barrier-diversion was partially completed this past fall, and the contractor is obligated under his contract with TU national to complete construction before runoff this spring. Once the construction is completed, we will give a full report (complete with pictures) and an accounting to GRTU.

    The contractor and Joe McGurrin (who’s been handling the project for TU national) are aware of the requirement of a sign acknowledging the grant from GRTU. We are planning to insert a plaque into the structure listing the groups that contributed to the project. When he pours the rest of the concrete, the contractor is to leave an indentation with bolt holes into which we’ll fix the plaque.

    Kevin



  • GRTU members -

    We have recieved a grant request through GRTU’s Coldwater Outreach Conservation (COC) grant program from the Eighty Niner Chapter of TU in Tulsa, requesting funding for assistance with work on the Lower Mountain Fork River in southern Oklahoma. Many of our Dallas and North Texas GRTU members fish these waters and their river and its history of conservation project work serves as a good model for us on the Guadalupe River.

    GRTU Board member Roger Turner has worked extensively with the 89′er chapter and the LMF River Foundation in preparing an outstanding grant application with good background and supporting informtion for the GRTU Board and Chapter members to consider. You can review the grant application at this link:

    http://www.viacoustics.com/LMFR_GRTU_CO … cation.pdf

    This will be the 5th major project that GRTU’s COC project has funded, including projects that now bear GRTU’s name in:

    • Trout Run Creek – Minnesota
    • South Platte River in Eleven Mile Canyon – Colorado
    • Los Alimitos Creek – New Mexico
    • Talarik Creek and the TU Pebble Mine Opposition Project – Alaska

    GRTU members are urged to review the application and express their support for funding assistance via this forum or by talking to your GRTU Board members. The grant application will be introduced at the upcoming Oct meeting for consideration for funding by the GRTU Board in January.

    Jeff Schmitt



  • The Truchas River Chapter of Trout Unlimited, Sante Fe, New Mexico, has submitted a grant application to GRTU for Coldwater Outreach Conservation Funding. The application has been posted here

    http://www.viacoustics.com/Truchas_Chapter_Proposal.pdf

    GRTU would like members to read the proposal as both a lesson in conservation and in support of coldwater fisheries throughout North America. You may post comments on the forum.

    For more info on the NEPA environmental impact process, see:

    http://www.nature.nps.gov/protectingres … intent.htm

    http://www.fedcenter.gov/programs/nepa/

    Additional information will be provided in the upcoming newsletter

    Jeff Schmitt



  • GRTU provided funding to the Cheyenne Mountain Chapter of Trout Unlimited (CMTU) to assist them with restoring a section of the South Platte River at Camp Alexander, a Boy Scout camp that is utilized by Texas Boy Scout troops.

    The CMTU folks have been sending me updates on the projects progress. I have posted these progress reports under the following links:

    Progress Report

    Slides

    Map

    CMTU and Camp Alexander are very grateful to GRTU for the funding and for our interest in their project.

    More reports will be issued as the work progresses.



  • GRTU provided funding to the Cheyenne Mountain Chapter of Trout Unlimited (CMTU) to assist them with restoring a section of the South Platte River at Camp Alexander, a Boy Scout camp that is utilized by Texas Boy Scout troops.

    The CMTU folks have been sending me updates on the projects progress. I have posted these progress reports under the following links:

    http://www.viacoustics.com/Camp_Alexand … Report.pdf

    http://www.viacoustics.com/Camp_Alexander_PPslides.pdf

    http://www.viacoustics.com/Camp_Alexand … ct_Map.pdf

    CMTU and Camp Alexander are very grateful to GRTU for the funding and for our interest in their project.

    More reports will be issued as the work progresses.

    Jeff



  • GRTU has received a grant application from the Cheyenne Mountain Chapter of Trout Unlimited (CMTU) in Colorado Springs for a stream improvement project on the South Platte River in Eleven Mile Canyon.

    Specifically, this project would benefit a section of the South Platte at Camp Alexander, a Boy Scout Camp that is heavily utilized by Boy Scout Troops from Texas. The project is a “Trees for Trout” project, which utilizes trees and root balls from the Hayman burn area and installs them along the river bank to deepen the stream channel, provide cover for trout and a better environment for aquatic insects.

    See full grant request at CMTU Grant

    agreed in principle to sustained flows out of Canyon Lake, the flows guaranteed were too small to sustain the Trout during the critical summer months. The outflows from the dam were as little as 25cfs.

    GRTU decided to take some action. With donations from chapter members, we established a legal defense fund and retained legal counsel. We filed with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Committee to force GBRA to release sustained summer flows that would insure the survival of the Trout through the heat of the summer. We were granted Petitioner status and after several years of negotiations, we arrived at an agreement with GBRA for trout protective flows that will sustain the trout fishery in over 10 miles of river.

    Now more than ever, the future looks bright for the Trout of the Guadalupe River. These flows also have the additional benefit that all popular traditional river activities are also enhanced by these increased summertime flows which help the local economy.

    In addition to our trout stockings and conservation programs on the Guadalupe, The GRTU also supports many local community projects like; Friends of the River annual river clean up, Project Kidfish; to introduce children to flyfishing, and Trout in the Classroom.

    The Guadalupe River Chapter of Trout Unlimited invites you to join our Chapter. We have General Meetings 3 times a year on the fourth Saturday of October, January, and April where there are activities, featured presentation, drawings and lunch. At our meetings we discuss our plans for the future of the Guadalupe River with the membership. We invite authors, experts, and guides to speak at our meetings about conservation, fishing techniques and destinations around the world. So come to one of general meetings and see for yourself what our chapter is all about.

    Check the announcements page for detailed meeting information