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PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 9:56 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 9:30 pm
Posts: 130
Location: San Marcos, TX
Hi all,
With these lower waters, the trout may not have been able to substantially disperse throughout all of the lease locations.
What are your views on getting an etiquette astream sticky to lay out the problem, indicate some of the behaviors (i.e. waders blocking access and refusing to rotate out over an hour, anglers moving upstream have the right of way. And how to deal with the guides coming into your holes... This is too nice a fishery to hear about the gripes throughout the board--- Not just from me..

Not to stir turds, but education can often be the best information. There are plenty of new trout fishers this year in the fishery, and I hate to see and hear others get discouraged about the fishery. A quick trip to the Madison (in the Park) or the San Juan will remind us that we are still in pretty good shape!
Here is a nice article that lays out the basics. Feel free to add your own experiences that may better allow us a more pleasant day on the river with the comradery that most fishermen experience.

Tight lines...

The Etiquette of Fly Fishing a Stream
By: Bob Bastian


Fly fishing can be enjoyed by everyone. It transcends all the boundaries associated with age, status, or wealth. Stream fly fishing is known as a gentle sport and that should be reflected in our stream manner and etiquette. For the most part, the rules of stream etiquette are nothing more then good old common sense. However, they might entail things that have been forgotten, or that a beginner might not think of while fly fishing.

One of the most important things to remember is not to crowd another fisherman. Sometimes the temptation is very strong to fish the same water where someone is catching a lot of fish, but that is as rude and inconsiderate as someone cutting into a serving line at a restaurant buffet. If you come upon a spot where someone is fly fishing and having a good catch, the proper thing to do is stop far back from the edge so the fish don't stop eating. You may watch for awhile, both because fly fishing is a beautiful sport to watch and perhaps you will learn something. If the person that was fishing moves further along the stream, it is acceptable to slowly and quietly enter the water where he had been fishing. Otherwise, move well beyond the fisherman to another point of the stream

Fly fishing casts a common bond amongst all people that love and appreciate the sport. It is important to be friendly to other fishermen that you may come across. If you meet another fly fisherman who is outside the stream, take a moment to be friendly. Sometimes a little chat will give you insight as to what patterns are working best that day, or you could give some tip that will help him to have a better day. If you come upon a fly fisherman that is in the stream a friendly nod or wave is sufficient. Be friendly to all fishermen not just those fly fishing. You never know, sometimes a few minutes spent talking with a non-fly fisherman, could result in his wanted to give the sport a try.

Taking care of the environment is essential in stream etiquette. Stream fly fishing is done in some of the most beautiful areas of the country. It is essential that we do everything we can to keep it that way. No one should ever litter. The environment should look exactly like it did when you have finished fishing for the day as it did when you started. It is not uncommon to see someone who is fly fishing picking up any litter that they come across on the stream banks, or in the water, and carrying it out with them. It only takes a moment to clean up after yourself and that will keep the area beautiful.

While fly fishing a stream, always remember to respect the trout. Trout have been blessed with the natural instinct and temperament to make them a real challenge to a fly fisherman. Only keep what you intend to eat, release any others. [i][i]([i]This of course, does not apply to GRTU lease holder as we pledge to release all of our trout.-)
[/i]The basics of stream etiquette for fly fishing are very simple. By following them you will ensure that you are doing your best for the environment and you will always be a welcome stream companion.

Article Source: http://www.rightarticle.com[/i][/i]Feel free to "Unsticky" this one, but with all of recent complaints I'm hearing on this board and others) I think the basics need to brought to the new-comers, and possibly revisited by the more seasoned, on the heavily fished trout stream...

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Last edited by jchristensen77 on Thu Dec 23, 2010 12:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 21, 2010 11:42 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 02, 2008 4:39 pm
Posts: 72
What to do if you're in a floating conveyance (pontoon, float tube, canoe, etc.) and come upon flyfishermen? Portaging around is impractical and disturbing the waters almost unavoidable with very low power craft being unable to fight the current. The best I can think of is to get out and go around on the opposite bank if the river is wide enough. There are some very narrow spots where this isn't possible. Mostly not an issue for me because I do very well upstream of the leases, anyway. I do know of some that like to float all the way through, though.

Pon


jchristensen77 wrote:
Hi all,
With these lower waters, the trout may not have been able to substantially disperse throughout all of the lease locations.
What are your views on getting an etiquette astream sticky to lay out the problem, indicate some of the behaviors (i.e. waders blocking access and refusing to rotate out over an hour, anglers moving upstream have the right of way. And how to deal with the guides coming into your holes... This is too nice a fishery to hear about the gripes throughout the board--- Not just from me..

Not to bust ba*ls, but education can often be the best information. There are plenty of new trout fishers this year in the leases, and I hate to see and hear others get discouraged about the fishery. A quick trip to the Madison (in the Park) or the San Juan will remind us that we are still in pretty good shape!
Here is a nice article that lays out the basics. Feel free to add your own experiences that may better allow us a more pleasant day on the river with the comradery that most fishermen experience.

Tight lines...

The Etiquette of Fly Fishing a Stream
By: Bob Bastian


Fly fishing can be enjoyed by everyone. It transcends all the boundaries associated with age, status, or wealth. Stream fly fishing is known as a gentle sport and that should be reflected in our stream manner and etiquette. For the most part, the rules of stream etiquette are nothing more then good old common sense. However, they might entail things that have been forgotten, or that a beginner might not think of while fly fishing.

One of the most important things to remember is not to crowd another fisherman. Sometimes the temptation is very strong to fish the same water where someone is catching a lot of fish, but that is as rude and inconsiderate as someone cutting into a serving line at a restaurant buffet. If you come upon a spot where someone is fly fishing and having a good catch, the proper thing to do is stop far back from the edge so the fish don't stop eating. You may watch for awhile, both because fly fishing is a beautiful sport to watch and perhaps you will learn something. If the person that was fishing moves further along the stream, it is acceptable to slowly and quietly enter the water where he had been fishing. Otherwise, move well beyond the fisherman to another point of the stream

Fly fishing casts a common bond amongst all people that love and appreciate the sport. It is important to be friendly to other fishermen that you may come across. If you meet another fly fisherman who is outside the stream, take a moment to be friendly. Sometimes a little chat will give you insight as to what patterns are working best that day, or you could give some tip that will help him to have a better day. If you come upon a fly fisherman that is in the stream a friendly nod or wave is sufficient. Be friendly to all fishermen not just those fly fishing. You never know, sometimes a few minutes spent talking with a non-fly fisherman, could result in his wanted to give the sport a try.

Taking care of the environment is essential in stream etiquette. Stream fly fishing is done in some of the most beautiful areas of the country. It is essential that we do everything we can to keep it that way. No one should ever litter. The environment should look exactly like it did when you have finished fishing for the day as it did when you started. It is not uncommon to see someone who is fly fishing picking up any litter that they come across on the stream banks, or in the water, and carrying it out with them. It only takes a moment to clean up after yourself and that will keep the area beautiful.

While fly fishing a stream, always remember to respect the trout. Trout have been blessed with the natural instinct and temperament to make them a real challenge to a fly fisherman. Only keep what you intend to eat, release any others. [i][i]([i]This of course, does not apply to GRTU lease holder as we pledge to release all of our trout.-)
[/i]The basics of stream etiquette for fly fishing are very simple. By following them you will ensure that you are doing your best for the environment and you will always be a welcome stream companion.

Article Source: http://www.rightarticle.com[/i][/i]Feel free to "Unsticky" this one, but with all of recent complaints I'm hearing on this board and others) I think the basics need to brought to the new-comers, and possibly revisited by the more seasoned, on the heavily fished trout stream...


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 10:17 am 
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Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 6:04 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Canyon Lake, Tx.
I don't think pontoons, kayaks, canoes bother the fish when the bite is on. I have regularly caught fish right while/after kayaks have passed thru my fishing area.

If someone is fishing a spot that I may have wanted to fish, well they got there first so have at it. Never heard of any 1 hour rule, seen plenty of folks sit in the same spot for more than a hour, could not understand it at times tho as they caught nothing.

Like stated above, common sense/courtesy is all that is needed when you come upon someone else fishing. Give a wide a berth as possible when going around, wade quietly & let them know you are going behind them when you do.

I rarely see rude behavior from TU members, that usually happens down by the dam from the tourist fishers that probably don't know any better. Honestly I've only encountered one rude TU member, he thought I had no right to fish in an TU leased area. TU may lease the land, but the water is everyone's.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 10:23 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2007 12:52 pm
Posts: 299
Location: Austin
I've been fishing runs when a flotilla of kayaks came right through the prime water and, a few minutes later, the fishing was as good as it was before the onslaught.

I agree with Fishbrains about TU members. I've yet to meet on on the water who wasn't well-mannered.

About the TU member who took umbrage at you fishing a lease: You're right, of course. Our lease program just provides access to the river. The water belongs to everyone. However, in his defense, it does seem selfish to me for one to fish our leases and not become a member. GRTU does so much good, I would think that anyone who takes advantage of the river it has helped revitalize would want to contribute his fair share.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 12:27 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2002 9:26 am
Posts: 1013
Location: San Antonio, TX
Maybe it's just me, but when I am fishing amoung a bunch of other anglers, I tend to strike up a conversation. I know that I usually talk to much versus too little, but a little talk can go a long way to letting the others around you're just a regular guy out to do a little fishing. And letting them know your wishes to fish a certain area will ease any tension. When someone tries to force their way into a certain area crowding other anglers in silence, I think that is the definition of rude behavior, but the noneless allow them access asking them if they wish to fish through. Often if you want to fish a certain stretch, drop, or hole, all you have to do is ask and your wish will be granted. If you are the angler giving way and you want to get back into your original area just walk around and behind the angler you are giving way to and follow him back into it.
As far as people floating through, as wading fishermen we often need to give way to the floating traffic. There are many places, like Pott's, where the boats have no choice but to float through the deeper troughs in these low flows. And like Alex said these fish often go right back to feeding as soon as the boats pass. I even saw instances this summer were the Trout were following floatillas of tubers because they were feeding bread to the ducks and the Trout were also taking advantage of the buffet.
So when out fishing on the river be aware of the others around you sharing the water. And be gratious in their ability to fish the entire river just as you would wish they grant you the same favor.

Jimbo


Last edited by Jimbo Roberts on Wed Dec 22, 2010 2:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:33 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 6:04 pm
Posts: 9
Location: Canyon Lake, Tx.
Alex Argyros wrote:
However, in his defense, it does seem selfish to me for one to fish our leases and not become a member.


Seems you have the same attitude as that young man did.

I pay for the right to fish where I do, if I happen to pass by a leased area, oh well.

Like I said it was one time, considering I've fished the guadalupe since '76 I'd say you all have a good track record.

Maybe I'm wrong, but TU seemed to me to be an org. of & for flyfishermen, I'm not one so I why would I join that org.? Don't get me wrong, I luv what you all do, but I want to fit in with the other folks if I join some org.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 9:30 pm
Posts: 130
Location: San Marcos, TX
Fishbrains wrote:
Alex Argyros wrote:
Like I said it was one time, considering I've fished the guadalupe since '76 I'd say you all have a good track record.

Maybe I'm wrong, but TU seemed to me to be an org. of & for flyfishermen, I'm not one so I why would I join that org.? Don't get me wrong, I luv what you all do, but I want to fit in with the other folks if I join some org.


Common misconception, TU (or GRTU) is not an organization of flyfisherman for flyfisherman.
Federation of Flyfishers takes the cake on that designation....

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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 2:49 pm 
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Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2002 9:26 am
Posts: 1013
Location: San Antonio, TX
TU and GRTU are conservation organizations first and foremost. That is a mistake most make who are unfamiliar with our organization. It's this track record of conservation and restoration of which we are most proud, and not the catching of Trout. This is the core believe of our organization. And of course many of those viewing things from the outside may view the organization as a group of flyfishing elitists. Those who love these cold water fisheries the most and want to protect them are the fishermen who enjoy them and believe they can be better. Now that being said many of these anglers prefer to flyfish, but we are not exclusively flyfishermen, we are all fishermen first. Many of the pioneers were and are still spinfishermen. Names like Dave Whitlock, Ted Williams, and our own Joe Robinson, just to name a few, spinfish for Trout a lot. I myself started out fishing for Trout with spincasting gear. These same great fishermen also pratice Trout conservation while spinfishing, fishing with single hook lures, and even flys, using good catch and release techniques all while using spincasting gear. Spinfishing and conservation are not mutually exclusive. Like I said before, it's not the tackle, it's the fishermen using the tackle that makes all the difference. And therefore most importantly we are a group of people who, reguardless of tackle preferences, want to see our cold water fisheries thrive.
It's also true there can be reverse discrimination by spinfishermen who view flyfishermen as taking over their favorite streams and rivers, feeling threatened by the lack of other spinfishermen on our Trout waters. There was a huge surge in interest in flyfishing when the movie "A River Runs Through It" came out. This coinsided with an ongoing revolution in tackle and techniques that made flyfishing much more effective. Maybe this move away from spinfishing and to flyfishing created animosity amoung the remaining spinfishermen who didn't understand it. Maybe it is because they just didn't take the time to talk to them, get to know them, and come to the understanding that we all just enjoying some fishing too. Or maybe they tried flyfishing tackle and just did not get the proper instruction or encouragement, and gave up because they could not master the tackle and catch the numbers they did with their more familiar conventional tackle and techniques. Everyone needs to embrace our differences and we must accept these differences or we will end up being devisive and lose the fact that we all love fishing and can help one another. Together we are stronger than we are divided. We need everyone's understanding and cooperation if we are to continue to make enhancements in our fishery. Divided progress stops while we bicker about our differences instead of our common ground. Together there is nothing we can not accomplish.

Jimbo


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 22, 2010 5:14 pm 
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[quote="Jimbo Roberts"]TU and GRTU are conservation organizations first and foremost. Yes, that is one of the most admirable things your organization does that creates a lot of respect from my end and the public in general. The conservation is focused on trout if I understand correctly. This also helps other, more rugged, native species out in the process. So THANKS, as I am not exclusively a trout fisherman spending less than 10% of my efforts targeting trout and going to the lower Guadalupe. But I always catch and release something interesting when I go to the lower and have you guys to thank for it. In general, my particular interests are in the quiet, solitude and scenery as much as the beauty of fish, since I get plenty of socialization from a large volume of human interactions at work. That's just me, to each his own. Maybe something could be set up on your web site for $ contributions from the public.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 12:52 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 9:30 pm
Posts: 130
Location: San Marcos, TX
I have an interesting scenario...
Whenever I get to the river and I see another angler, after some small-talk (i.e. weather, names exchanged, whats working, etc.) I always ask "are you working upstream or down. I'm usually met with a confusing look as many fishermen tend to not move but instead park themselves until they leave the spot. To each his (or her) own. Its their experience, not mine.
What is the standard practice, given that the first one there gets the right-away?
I'm used to the angler working upstream has the right-away, but what happens when nobody is moving?

Another stupid question, but just curious as to what is the standard "Texas" way to do it when we arent in an area where there is a nice bank to walk around. I dont want to trespass by walking onto someone's property.

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PostPosted: Thu Dec 23, 2010 2:09 am 
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Location: San Antonio, TX
I'm with you. I usually am moving upstream or down. It is true that when I hit a spot and catch a few I will linger a bit to see what number can be caught. And as is usual the catching slows and I move on looking for the next hot spot. I bet I walk at least 3 or 4 miles most days wading. Of course that's not all in a straight line. There is a bunch wandering around, moving back and through again anglers permiting, covering ground whichever way I'm headed, and walking back to the car to try another lease access site. I guess that is left over from my tournament Bass fishing days, run and gun wading style.

I'm not sure you could characterize any particular style as a Texas Style. I guess it's just like anywhere else, you get a mix of different anglers and many different styles all at once.
Jimbo


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 26, 2010 5:02 pm 
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Location: TX & CO
This is always an interesting topic. I posed a similar set of questions/rules on Itinerant Angler a couple of months ago. Rather than rehash that, I will simply provide a link:

Click here for that discussion

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 26, 2010 6:52 pm 
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Posts: 72
castell wrote:
This is always an interesting topic. I posed a similar set of questions/rules on Itinerant Angler a couple of months ago. Rather than rehash that, I will simply provide a link:

Click here for that discussion


Thanks for the very informative link, Castell.

One thing not mentioned is that unless it is the first time visiting a stretch of water, you, or the guide will know more or less what to expect. If the water is to be hit on Saturday, at 10 am during peak season, one can pretty much anticipate what areas will be occupied and make plans to allow for that, like getting much less fishing time or having to settle for enjoying the ambiance. This is where something like a one man pontoon will be an advantage, since there are always productive areas that can't be accessed from the bank. You can move a pontoon along quickly without having to gather your gear if someone encroaches or vacates. Of course, if everyone has a pontoon, (kayaks and canoes are not as well suited) as you see in some occasional places out West, that might decrease the advantage if everyone has a pole. One Summer, I was able to prove to myself that it is possible to catch trout a few feet away from drifting tubers using spin gear. Of course the rowdy atmosphere is a real negative which is intolerable, but I was able to quickly move beyond their take out point and have a decent trip.

Pon


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 27, 2010 1:19 pm 
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Joined: Thu Nov 15, 2007 9:30 pm
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Location: San Marcos, TX
castell wrote:
This is always an interesting topic. I posed a similar set of questions/rules on Itinerant Angler a couple of months ago. Rather than rehash that, I will simply provide a link:

Click here for that discussion



Good stuff...

Now.... If we can only get a discussion like this to apply to the Pedernales River when I like to catch and release the white bass as quietly as humanly possible to minimize the Jon boats running directly into me and utterly ruining my day....
Maybe I will cross over to spread the word at www.austinbassfishing.com to only get banned from the site again! :mrgreen:

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