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Fun with fur and feathers

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mickmcco
Site Admin
Posts: 274
Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2005 6:59 pm
Location: Fairview, TX

Post by mickmcco » Mon Jan 05, 2009 2:06 pm

The flies are for both the Blue and the Guad. The Blue is two hours north of here, the Guad is 4.5 hours south.

Since one of the dominant forms of bug life on the Blue is the dobsonfly, I'm tying olive woolly buggers and Guadalupanas to emulate the dobsonfly larva, also known as a hellgrammite. The Blue also has a fair number of Tricos and small, light-colored midges (or did on my only trip up there), so I'm tying more of those as well.

The rest of the flies are to fill holes in my Guad boxes.
Mickfly
Fish Friendly - Life's too short not to enjoy every minute on the river.

dale_connally
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Nov 19, 2006 10:08 pm
Location: Lorena, TX

Post by dale_connally » Mon Jan 05, 2009 4:36 pm

For those not familiar with the Yong's special.
http://prairiegoat.com/Fishing/FlyPatte ... pecial.htm

Dale

TARH2O
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:06 pm
Location: Bergheim, TX

Post by TARH2O » Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:18 pm

That Yong's fly is deceptively simple. It made me start to think about twinning methods for threads. Has anyone ever taken two threads and wound them together (like a black and a red) to get a different effect for wrapping on flies?

mickmcco
Site Admin
Posts: 274
Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2005 6:59 pm
Location: Fairview, TX

Post by mickmcco » Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:41 pm

Sure have. There's a guy named Don Holbook who wrote a book called Midge Magic. In it, he described his research on midges -- microscopic studies of the contents of trout stomachs -- that led him to use two contrasting threads, wrapped together, to form the body of a midge pupa or larva. It's a fascinating book and he's devised some killer patterns.
Mickfly
Fish Friendly - Life's too short not to enjoy every minute on the river.

TARH2O
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2009 12:06 pm
Location: Bergheim, TX

Post by TARH2O » Tue Jan 20, 2009 1:01 pm

As always Mick you are a fount of knowledge - a real life Cliff Clavin (meant with the utmost of respect).

Looks like I have some reading to do. :D

Alex Argyros
Posts: 387
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2007 12:52 pm
Location: Austin

Post by Alex Argyros » Tue Jan 20, 2009 5:17 pm

An interesting variation of this idea is Charlie Craven's Jujubee series of flies, which uses multiple strands of superhair to form fly bodies. The segmentation he achieves with minimal bulk is incredible.

mickmcco
Site Admin
Posts: 274
Joined: Sat Nov 05, 2005 6:59 pm
Location: Fairview, TX

Post by mickmcco » Wed Jan 21, 2009 7:27 am

I've been called a lot of things before, but never Cliff Clavin! :P

Charlie's Jujubee flies look great. I bought the materials, but never tied them. They are both online at his site: http://www.charliesflyboxinc.com/flybox/

And in his new book: Charlie Craven's Basic Fly Tying
Mickfly
Fish Friendly - Life's too short not to enjoy every minute on the river.

Danny S
Posts: 141
Joined: Tue Jan 02, 2007 9:09 am
Location: Helotes, TX

Post by Danny S » Wed Jan 21, 2009 8:33 am

I've tried, but had a hard time keeping the superhair from twisting as I wound it. It's crucial to keep them lined properly while building the body so the "rib" color stays in alignment, but the superhair is sooooo fine. Maybe one of these days I'll figure it out. Would say one of four turned out just OK. I may tackle it again one day.

His recipe is great in that the superhair gives that effect of epoxy or glue on the body, without the bulk.

Alex Argyros
Posts: 387
Joined: Mon Apr 23, 2007 12:52 pm
Location: Austin

Post by Alex Argyros » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:26 am

Danny,

I had problems with the superhair twisting too. My solution was to use the rotary feature of my vise (helps a lot) and to keep the cluster a 90 degree angle to the shank of the hook even when I was starting to wind the superhair around the bend (i.e., don't try to follow the bend with the superhair, keep it at a right angle to the main body of the hook).

It also helps to build a super smooth base on the hook with your tying thread.

Jimbo Roberts
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Joined: Fri Nov 08, 2002 8:26 am
Location: San Antonio, TX

Post by Jimbo Roberts » Wed Jan 21, 2009 10:39 am

The Jujubee Midge looks good enough to make me want to start tying some up!
http://www.charliesflyboxinc.com/uploads/DSCN25753.jpg
Jimbo

Danny S
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Joined: Tue Jan 02, 2007 9:09 am
Location: Helotes, TX

Post by Danny S » Wed Jan 21, 2009 11:12 am

Thanks Alex--good tip!

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