Fly Tying Tip of the Day

Fun with fur and feathers

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Tue Jan 23, 2007 6:38 pm

I saw this tip while reading another forum and thought I would mention it here.
wrap a length of biots around a pencil ... now you can get at them

Image
Harry Mason

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Thu Jan 25, 2007 10:33 pm

Use a pet hair comb to get most of the under fur out of your flytying materials, such as deer belly or body hair, elk hair, arctic fox, or even some of the newer senthetics such as pseudo hair. They can also help straighten and untangel your bundled up fibers like angel hair flashing or z-lon.

http://www.petsmart.com/global/product_ ... b&N=2&Ne=2

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Fri Jan 26, 2007 4:47 pm

Use steam to straighten out curled or bent hackles and hairs with an old tea kettle.

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Sun Jan 28, 2007 8:48 pm

Keep a magnet handy. They work great for finding small hooks and bead heads that drop and become lost in your carpet.

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Mon Jan 29, 2007 9:29 pm

speaking of magnets, if you strugle picking up small hooks or beads off your tying table try magnatizing your scissors. Rub the blade of your scissors along a strong magnet a couple of times to magnatize it, you can always demagnatize it later by stroking the scissors along the magnet in the opposite dirrections.

Danny S
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Post by Danny S » Tue Jan 30, 2007 9:42 am

Spot on about the magnets! I once dumped a bunch of hooks (100-200)accidentally and a magnet came to my rescue. I always keep the small magnet sheets that come in the Tiemco hook packs. When getting ready to tie, I place several bare hooks on one and pick them off as I tie, I also place tied flies on one until I am ready to load them into a fly box.

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Tue Jan 30, 2007 10:59 pm

After you tie off and before you cut it, pull on your thread in an up and down / side to side motion to help sink in the knot. You will feel it snug up even tighter as you are doing this.

rstarnes
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Post by rstarnes » Wed Jan 31, 2007 7:30 am

Re: Magnets

This is not a fly tying tip per se, but I glued a small magnet to my fishing vest and use it to temporarily hold my fly(ies) while I am changing tippet, droppers, etc.

Also...I use my wife's fingernail polish and lacquer to dress and cement the heads of flies. The polishes and lacquers dry fast and are waterproof AND they don't prematurely dry out in the bottle like some of the other cements tend to do. If your wife is like mine, there are bottles of this stuff laying around your house that have been discarded as they are not the color du jeur. A lesson learned: Ask before using!!!
Rob Starnes

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Wed Jan 31, 2007 12:04 pm

I use finger nail pollish to coat my epoxy flies that havent fully cured correctly from not mixing it exactly 50:50 and remain sticky. Use "Hard As Nails" it dries clear and will make the epoxy fishable. Rub the sticky epoxy with a fine cloth, like an old t-shirt, to take out any finger prints left on it before you apply the nail pollish.

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Fri Feb 02, 2007 1:50 am

Keep a small glass of water on your tying table to dunk your finger tips in or a feather to help control all the loose fibers. Its so much easier to tie a nice neat fly when everything is laid down flat and out of the way of your thread wraps...

Learned this from watching Lefty tie in a video.

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Mon Feb 05, 2007 10:15 am

Tying every day keeps your nasty looking flies away! :D

John M. White
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Post by John M. White » Mon Feb 05, 2007 10:30 am

Also, as you're tying a fly, if each step isn't just right, stop and re do it. If you have a certain material that is tied in wrong, or a little sloppy, and you just proceed, that usually comes back to haunt you later in the process, resulting in a mediocre looking fly. Resist the temptaion to tie for speed on complicated flies with many steps. These are two things I have learned.
Thanks,

John Michael

Fine Art Nature, Wildlife, & Sporting Photography, visit: www.johnmwhitephotography.com .

John M. White
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Post by John M. White » Mon Feb 05, 2007 10:47 am

Here's a cool article I found in Flyfisherman magazine on hackling. I think this technique may solve some of my hackling frustrations. Maybe others will find it useful too.

http://flyfisherman.com/ftb/hwhackle/
Thanks,

John Michael

Fine Art Nature, Wildlife, & Sporting Photography, visit: www.johnmwhitephotography.com .

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Mon Feb 05, 2007 12:07 pm

Making your peacock herl bodies more durrable. Always lay down a thin coat of cement before making your wraps with the herl to bond them to the hook so that if they get frayed up from fish they will not become completely unraveled. Wrap a thin wire in the opposite direction that you wraped in your herl to help lock them in. You can twist a few strands together to form a chenille style rope, but this may give you to much bulk for smaller flies.. If the strands you are using are to brittle and break, you can soak them in a glass of water to make them softer.

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AlanKulcak
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Post by AlanKulcak » Tue Feb 06, 2007 11:58 am

after you finally nail a pattern and get it just they way you want it, resist the urge to fish it, put it aside to use as an example. Using this fly as a model you can learn to consistantly produce the same fly with the correct portions and size.

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