Just Another day on the Guad

Non-Trout pursuits

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Jimbo Roberts
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Just Another day on the Guad

Post by Jimbo Roberts » Wed Jul 09, 2008 10:09 pm

Well I met up with Mike early this morning to do a little fishing on the Guadalupe. We started off the morning chasing some Rainbows.... Errr.... I should say Mike started off the day chasing some Rainbows. Let me explain. We both geared up and were to start nymph fishing as nothing was happening on top where we fished. Mike was into a fish right away. I waded a little ways downstream to fish another hole. Mike had a second fish on before I was finished building a leader and tying on my chosen nymphs. A few casts later I had a vicious strike, I came tight to the fish, and the whole leader broke off at the flyline. I saw the strike indicator race up stream and disappear in deeper water. Oops !!! Well I didn't have another leader on me, so I walked back upstream to the access and then back to the car to put on a new leader. I glue my leaders in with Zap-a-Gap and I hadn't changed this old leader out in a long time. It could also be that this container of Zap-a-Gap, almost 1 year old, is getting to thick to properly glue the leader butt to the braided core of the flyline, I'm not sure if that was the cause of the failure or not, but it will be replaced for sure now. Anyway a new leader was now on my 5 weight. By the time I returned to the holes we were going to fish, Mike had been through all of them and there was no point pounding the same places. So we moved much further upstream to reach some other holes to fish, but by then the sun was shining down on the water the the Trout had decided to take a nap.

It was mid-morning and time to go do some Perch Jerking anyway, so we moved to another access. Mike decided he would use an ultra-light flyrod of his and it was a, let's see.....
Hey Mike... What weight is that flyrod anyway?
Image
Oh... That's right it's a 2 weight.....
Now if you would just use this nymph and fish right here you can catch some of these.....
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I saved this couple from Jaws... certain death for sure...
Image
We continued fishing up the bank and caught many including.....
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You know this little Googleye pulled so hard I was sure that it was 4 times it's size before I actually saw it !!!!
Mike continued haunting the bank's edge.....
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I continued fishing a little deeper but still in the shady spots. I caught some of the Hill Country Natives that Ron documents so well in all it's drainages.....
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The day wore on and Mike had to leave to get back home.
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He could not help but to try a few more casts before getting out.....
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I moved back down to Perch World and finished out the day with a nice little Largemouth before being chased off the river by a thunderstorm.
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It had been another nice day on the Guadalupe finishing up just short of a 100 to hand. Jimbo

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Ron Mc
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Post by Ron Mc » Thu Jul 10, 2008 10:46 am

way cool - thanks for the goggleye photo, Ambloplites sp.
I've caught them myself in the Guad, but not since I had a digital camera.
I may borrow that photo sometime...if you don't mind.
Ron Mc

Jimbo Roberts
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Post by Jimbo Roberts » Thu Jul 10, 2008 4:33 pm

Certainly... your welcome to use anything here. You know there used to be a population of Goggleyes on the lower end of Town Lake that where fairly big, some in the 12"+ range. I used them to place high in the Austin Angler Perch off one year. I probably would have won had it not rained and muddied up the water so bad. I wonder if they are still there? I also caught some downriver of Huaco Falls one year and one was easily 12-14" and maybe 1 1/2lbs. One thing for sure, with that big tail of their's, they can really put up a fight for their size! Jimbo

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Ron Mc
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Post by Ron Mc » Thu Jul 10, 2008 5:21 pm

here is Ewell's big warmouth from Center Point, L. gluosus
Image
I'm flying to AK next weekend to work for a week, then Ewell is going to meet me the following weekend and we're heading to Kenai for a few days. We'll fish for rainbows and dollies, but we'll get a bycatch of reds - and some photos...
Ron Mc

Jimbo Roberts
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Post by Jimbo Roberts » Thu Jul 10, 2008 6:06 pm

Looking forward to those photos! Jimbo

Jimbo Roberts
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Post by Jimbo Roberts » Thu Jul 10, 2008 7:52 pm

I did a little investigation and on the TPWD site descibes the Warmouth as having 10 spines on the dorsal fin and 3 spines on the anal fin.....
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/species/war/
If you look at my photo that fish has at least 10 spines on the dorsal fin, but 6 spines on the anal fin. I wonder if the fish has some variation that is not mentioned or is it something else? Seems the only thing that comes close in description to having 5 or more spines on the anal fin are Crappie and I don't think it's a Crappie! Jimbo
Last edited by Jimbo Roberts on Fri Jul 11, 2008 11:12 am, edited 3 times in total.

Alex Argyros
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Post by Alex Argyros » Thu Jul 10, 2008 9:47 pm

I fished the tailrace this morning. Modest luck (four trout, one that was 20" on the stream but shrank to 17" when my net met a tape measure later on).

I saw three boats full of people on a river cleaning mission. I thanked them but didn't catch who they were or what organization they were representing. Does anyone have any information about these generous souls?

Alex

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Ron Mc
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Post by Ron Mc » Fri Jul 11, 2008 7:26 am

here are the 3 spines on a warmouth, Lepomis gluosis
Image

your fish is what I call a goggleye, also known as a rock bass, and is an
Ambloplites sp. - they have 6 spines on the anal fin.
There are many species of those in the SE, and they get subtle differentiating common names, Shadow bass, etc.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:ShadowBass.jpg


Alex, sounds like you had a great day.
Ron Mc

bhigdon

Post by bhigdon » Fri Jul 11, 2008 9:27 am

The group cleaning the river was some of the local guides, 3 boat loads of trash. All in all it wasn't as bad as we thought.

The guides were Chris Jackson, Keven Stubbs, Jeff Davis, Banning Collins, and a couple of their friends.

Alex Argyros
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Post by Alex Argyros » Fri Jul 11, 2008 9:46 am

Bill,

You have my sincere gratitude.

Thanks,
Alex

Jimbo Roberts
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Post by Jimbo Roberts » Fri Jul 11, 2008 10:55 am

You beat me to it. I did a little research myself and then came on to the forum, only to see your reply! Everybody is right.....
http://www.bio.txstate.edu/~tbonner/txf ... estris.htm
A true Rock Bass, how about that..... I've heard them called Warmouths by others and that is wrong. Their common name of Goggle-Eye is right though. Sure is nice to have a computor to reasearch this stuff! Interesting reading about the phylogeny and morphology!
The guides who cleaned the river just show us how dedicated and responsible our local guides are... Good Work Men! WORD also does weekly cleanups with their crews.
Jimbo

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Ron Mc
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Post by Ron Mc » Fri Jul 11, 2008 11:21 am

all of that is why at some point it is better to discuss taxonomy instead of common names.
TPWD lists warmouth, rock bass and goggle-eye all used as common names for both green sunfish L. cyanellus and warmouth L. gluosus (TPWD doesn't even list a goggle-eye/rock bass Ambloplites sp. as a resident).
Ron Mc

Jimbo Roberts
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Post by Jimbo Roberts » Fri Jul 11, 2008 12:09 pm

Yeap, the common names we use can really muddle the true meaning. When Yellowbellies or Longears are really Redbreast Sunfish http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wi ... stsunfish/
Where true Longears are sometimes called Cherry Sunfish http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wi ... arsunfish/
and a Goggle-Eye could be a Rock Bass http://www.bio.txstate.edu/~tbonner/txf ... estris.htm ,
Warmouth http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wild/species/war/ ,
or Green Sunfish http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/huntwild/wi ... ensunfish/ ,
things can get confusing ! Jimbo

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Ron Mc
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Post by Ron Mc » Fri Jul 11, 2008 12:50 pm

I've never had a problem sorting longears and yellow bellies, though, because you always see longears on their redds here - year round.

They're also the native sunfish here.
Even though yellow bellies seem to be predominant, they are imports from the east.
Ron Mc

Jimbo Roberts
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Post by Jimbo Roberts » Fri Jul 11, 2008 2:41 pm

I have understood the differences between true Redbreast and true Longears for a long time. It's just my most recent confusion when refering to true Rock Bass (which I have called Goggle-Eye for a long time) and true Warmouths. Both of which seem to use the names of the other commonly for both species leaving the listener to the conversation wondering which species the speaker was actually refering to in their conversation. I too was confused when I started to do some research because I too had thought I was talking about the same species when I actually not. When I saw your picture of the Warmouth I knew then that this was a seperate species. Me being me, I started to wonder if my descriptions were leading to the confusion of the readers of this article and I decided I better do some more research and post the results to clarify them. There are so many species of Sunfish that it is easy to be lead astray when refering to them by anything other than their scientific names, that few will recognize, accepting someone like yourself Ron. It's been fun anyway doing some more research. I probably should have stayed true to my original aspirations, and become a research scientist, but I took too many detours along the way. Jimbo

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